Sunscreen

Overwhelming

 

An estimated 8,000 to 14,000 metric tons of sunscreen washes off swimmers’ bodies annually with the potential to cause damage to fragile aquatic ecosystems including coral reefs.

Why does it bypass wastewater treatment facilities?

 

Although individuals living inland may not have direct contact with the ocean their sunscreen may.  Oxybenzone is an active ingredient in many products including sunscreen that is absorbed into the skin when applied, and  can be detected in your urine 30 minutes after sunscreen application.  

This means that when you go to the bathroom or take a shower, the chemicals in your sunscreen are washed down the drain and into the wastewater treatment facilities.  Oxybenzone, octinoxate, and many other sunscreen chemicals bypass our wastewater treatment facilities and end up back in the environment.

The chemicals  travel  downstream  eventually reaching the ocean, causing coral bleaching and reproductive problems in fish and other marine life.   

Since applying sunscreen is a common practice for outdoor recreation, the chemicals found in most sunscreens are directly washed into our rivers, lakes, and oceans.

Here’s what might be in your popular sunscreen...

  1. Oxybenzone/benzophenone-3 (BZ)-can be found in many sunscreen products.  It is a UV blocking chemical, but over 50 studies have shown it to be harmful to reproduction and overall health - from mammals to corals.
  2. 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (MBC)- is often added as a UV blocking chemical to sunscreen lotions and a myriad of other cosmetic products.  Unfortunately, it is not allowed by the U.S. FDA to be used as a sunscreen ingredient in sunscreen products for human topical use.  Instead, because of a very sneaky loophole, it can be added to sunscreen lotion as a UV-stabilizer for fragrances.  Some products contain as much as or more than 2.5% MBC.  MBC does contribute to the overall SPF rating, but it should technically not be allowed to add to this contribution.
  3. Octinoxate -  also called octyl methoxycinnamate.  It is used as a legal UV-blocking ingredient, but a number of studies have demonstrated it to be a notorious endocrine disruptor.
  4. Avobenzone - is a less stable derivative of oxybenzone.  It is a less effective UV absorber than oxybenzone, and when it is added to a product that also contains octinoxate, it will rapidly breakdown the avobenzone in the presence of light. At the moment, there is almost no studies on the ecotoxicity of avobenzone, though a recent study presented at a conference in 2016 by L’Oreal concluded that avobenzone, like oxybenzone, could induce coral bleaching
  5. Polyethylene - this refers to polyethylene microbeads.  It is meant to impact a “luxurious” and smooth feel to the lotion, but it has recently been banned and phased out by 2018  with the passing of US Congressional Act.
  6. Homosalate - another popular and legal UV-sunscreen ingredient.  Very little is known about its toxicity, though several studies show it to be an estrogenic endocrine disruptor, as well as an anti-androgenic endocrine disruptor.
  7. Octisalate - Popular UV-sunscreen ingredient, and with its chemical cousin, very little is known about its toxicity in regards to long-term exposure.  As with most of these chemicals, it can cause allergic contact dermatitis in humans.  It can also act as an endocrine disruptor.
  8. Octocrylene - Very little is known about the toxicity of octocrylene to either humans or wildlife.  What studies exist on mammals was done predominantly by Proctor & Gamble; they concluded that octocrylene as being safe.  A study was just published in the journal Chemosphere demonstrating that octocrylene (1) can accumulate to high levels in fish, (2) it acts as a “double threat” endocrine disruptor causing anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic activity, and (2) cause reproductive toxicity.
  9. Parabens - There are at least six different parabens that are used as product preservatives.  Parabens induce a number of human to coral toxicities.  First, it is an infamous estrogenic endocrinee disruptor. Second, it can cause oxidative damage to DNA - meaning that it causes mutations and can induce proliferation of some types of cancer cells, especially breast cancers.  Third, it is associated with a significant drop in male infertility by damaging the mitochondria of sperm.
  10. PABA (para-aminobenzoic acid) - PABAs come in a number of different chemical derivatives.  It is another UV-sunscreen chemical, but because of consumer avoidance for this chemical, many manufacturers have removed it from their products.  It causes allergic contact dermatitis, but the concern centers around a number of studies that show PABAs of being broad-range endocrine disruptors.  Besides acting like an estrogen, it has also been shown to disrupt thryoid function. Finally, there was evidence that it may also be genotoxic, causing damage to DNA.

Like many compounds, certain individuals are allergic to  titanium dioxide and zinc oxide.  However, these ingredients are known for being used in products for sensitive skin.  Like any product, be observant of effects and stop use if you experience irritation.  

A good rule of thumb is testing a small amount on your arm and if you begin to get irritated, then try finding sunscreens with just zinc oxide or other natural ingredients.

Nanotized titanium dioxide and zinc oxide pose a threat to human and wildlife health.  Both oxides can induce oxidative damage when exposed to sunlight.  Zinc oxide in a nanotized form has been shown to induce coral bleaching.

Humans

Many sunscreen ingredients including oxybenzone are readily absorbed through the skin and are thought to be endocrine disruptors, that affect users' hormones and reproductive functions.

Coral

Multiple active ingredients in sunscreen including oxybenzone have been proven to contribute to the bleaching of coral.  Coral bleaching occurs when there is an increase in temperature or other stress factor including pollution, which stresses the algae of the coral and causes the algae to leave.  The algae in the coral is what gives the organism its vibrant color, so once it’s gone the coral become white or “bleached”.   This process reduces the corals’ ability to reproduce.  It also damages coral DNA which leads to deformities, and acts as an endocrine disruptor that causes the coral larvae to inappropriately encase itself in its own stony skeleton during a crucial development time.

Coral reefs are already under great threat from pollution, overfishing and ocean acidification. Avoiding toxic sunscreen is one way you can help to protect the oceans and marine life for future generations.  

Fish

Oxybenzone is toxic to fish and it can result in the feminization in fish - both fresh and salt water.  Male fish over time take on female attributes, making reproduction difficult and disease widespread.  Remember ...If it’s toxic to marine life and the environment, it’s probably not great for your health too!

Calculate YOUR impact

To calculate the total potential pollution load of sunscreen chemicals, such as oxybenzone, at a particular dive site or beach consider this simple equation:

(Numbers of swimmers per day at a site) X (18 grams of sunscreen per person) X (number of hours) =

Amount in grams of sunscreen lotion that contaminates a site

Then

(Amount of grams of sunscreen lotion at site) X (6% - the amount of oxybenzone in many lotions) =

Total Potential Amount in grams of oxybenzone at that site per day

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Non nano vs nano

Nanoparticles are fragments of a material that are smaller than 100 nm.  For conversions one nanometer is equivalent to one-billionth of a meter!  In order to determine if a product is nano or non-nano, companies may use scanning electron micrographs, sedimentation analysis, surface area calculations, and light scattering analysis to determine the particles size as greater or less than 100 nm.  

In the US, the FDA has not defined nano and non-nano products compared to the EU and Australia that acknowledge nanoparticles as less than 100 nm, and the Environmental Working Group also suggests using non-nano products over nano.  The controversy of nano versus non-nano products lies in the ability for nanoparticles to be absorbed through the skin and enter the body and bloodstream increasing the risk of nanoparticles disrupting cell walls and tissues.  Non-nano based products are recommended  since they lie on the skin's surface and do not pose any harm compared to nano products.        

EU and Australia  (Badger, Goddess Garden statements http://www.badgerbalm.com/s-33-zinc-oxide-sunscreen-nanoparticles.aspx

http://www.goddessgarden.com/blog/nano-vs-non-nano-zinc-and-titanium/ 

Non-nano Zinc-oxide and titanium dioxide are considered better active ingredients in sunscreen compared to oxybenzone and other chemicals used in 80% of commercial sunscreens.  Zinc oxide is a compound naturally found in nature but is rare, therefore companies produce it in a lab to make a ‘natural identical mineral’.   Other natural ingredients in sunscreen include plant oils and butters which all have varying SPF’s.

There are 17 FDA approved ingredients that can be used as “Active” ingredients in sunscreens.  Oils and butters don’t contribute significant SPF to a product.

Biodegradeable

Beware of products labeled biodegradable or environmentally friendly; although they may break down faster than other products the amount of time they spend in the ocean can still harm coral reefs and other organisms. When choosing a sunscreen ignore the labels on the front that can be misleading and take the time to look at the active ingredients listed on the back.  Avoid products containing oxybenzone or any other chemicals listed above and avoid sunscreens that use nano Zinc or Titanium dioxide

Just Cover Up

Besides applying sunscreen there are other steps one can take to protect from the sun’s harmful UV rays.  Wearing hats, covering up with light weight clothing, wearing rash guards while in the water, staying in the shade, and choosing to be active in the morning or evenings will reduce your exposure to the sun's rays.

DIY Route

If you want to try and make your own homemade sunscreen, there are many resources on the web or at your local health food store.  We do not recommend depending on homemade recipes before you fully test their potency and protectability on your skin.  Below is a link to start your search if you are interested in exploring natural sunscreen recipes.

DIY: http://www.diynatural.com/homemade-sunscreen/

Recyclability

When purchasing sunscreen also keep in mind if you’re able to recycle the product or even refill it.  Buying sunscreen in bulk can save you money and reduce the amount of packaging used.  Avoid buying sunscreen in aerosol containers, because more product will end up on the sand and in the environment rather than on your skin.

Good Choices

Goddess Garden,  Stream2Sea, All Good Products & Badger are all products that are better options for yourself and the environment.  Besides containing either non-nano zinc oxide or titanium dioxide these products also include aloe, oils, and other natural  ingredients.

List Approved by  EWG:https://www.ewg.org/sunscreen/best-sunscreens/best-beach-sport-sunscreens/?tag=2012SunscreenAd&gclid=CjwKEAjwzJexBRCa_pGo8IK0ilASJABfGldbXkkfSWmqKOM26kGspnYFtKJKPFxXAEZKxDUK4X2iERoC1Lnw_wcB